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But what is a flag march?

July 8, 2010

Protest not allowed, this is Kashmir

So far in 2010, ‘security’ forces have killed 32 innocent Kashmiris, sometimes not even in a protest. Far from investigating these killings and promising justice, India has banned protest in Kashmir, which is what curfew amounts to, and even the media is not allowed to function. Curfew passes have been canceled even for journalists – there were no newspapers this morning. 12 photojournalists have been beaten up. Newspapers have been BANNED!

The Delhi media reports that the army has been brought into Srinagar for an indefinite period, and that the army staged a flag march. However, what is a flag march? It can’t be a security measure to deal with terrorists because there is complete curfew. The army has been asked to strictly impose the curfew. People are dying because they are not allowed to go to hospitals. After killing 32 innocent people what does “maximum crackdown” by 1,700 Indian troops in Srinagar mean? And if not even a bird is allowed on the streets, who or what is the flag march for?

In that fateful year 1989, one Attar Chand published a book, Defence Modernisation, Secret Deals and Strategy of Nations – Part I. In the book he writes on page 108:

What is a flag march – its background, purpose and description? It is an ancient concept of the Kings who used their armies to suppress difficult law and order situations in their kingdoms. King Ashoka and rulers in Mughal and medieval periods in India are said to have used their armies to quell civil up-risings in their territories. This worldwide concept had been frequently used by the British, first against their own people during the Tudor period in the 15th century, and then more freedly, in their colonies to suppress revolts organised by natives against the British rule. During the struggle for independence in India, these marches were often conducted by the British Indian army. [source]

Some food for thought, there.

7 Comments leave one →
  1. Shankar permalink
    July 8, 2010 5:37 PM

    It is good to see at least someone talking about what is happening. No one in the mainstream media seems to be asking the obvious question: instead of ranting about anti national elements, LeT and Pakistan, why is the government not doing the obvious and prosecuting those responsible for killing people (which in any case it should normally do under the law)? Since most of the protests are against the killings, surely that is obvious? Apparently not, in the smoke and mirrors world of our media and state craft. Where after all, there is no Kashmir dispute, no disputed territory, no people’s movement, no anti-India sentiment, no human rights violations, no real militancy (only a few hundred militants apparently), and no problem – but for some reason six lakh troops have been posted there.

  2. Sadaf permalink
    July 8, 2010 10:01 PM

    Dear Mr Shivam,

    I have read your tweets posts on Kashmir which are inflaming communal hatred and instigating Kashmiri Muslims. Please we don’t need you support. There are other regions in India which need your support.

    Thanks,
    Sadaf

  3. Asit permalink
    July 9, 2010 3:57 PM

    the writng on the wall in kashmir valley is clear the indian state should respect the democratic aspirations of kashmiri people

  4. Prashant permalink
    July 9, 2010 8:20 PM

    Wah wah, Shivam bhai is trying very hard to become famous… he no doubt knows the tricks of the trade, having obviously observed the likes of Arundhati Roy…. just say human rights and Kashmir, India get out, Indian Army rapists – and before you know it, you will be heralded as a fearless Indian intellectual, fighting the communal fascist Indian state….

  5. Zamir permalink
    July 10, 2010 1:04 PM

    Who does sadaf mean by “We”.

  6. Pringle Man permalink
    July 11, 2010 1:05 AM

    Good Lord, where people like Prashant emerge from, baffles me.

    Your ‘tactic’ is even more facile – divert the issues, throw in an irrelevant name, attack the person. Why not address the content? WHY are people out on the streets? WHY?

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